OUTRIGGER PADDLING

 GREEN SEA TURTLES IN THE WEST BAY

Waterman. Saving  Our  Blue  Planet

Surfers, a.k.a. watershooters, belong to a category of super-athletes known as “Waterman” - although the name applies to both men and women. As 1960’s world champion surfer Mike Doyle pointed out in his autobiography Morning Glass, “The tradition of the Waterman comes from Polynesia and is different from the tradition of the sailor. The Waterman's skills include surfing, paddling, rowing, and rough-water swimming. He might also be skilled at diving, fishing, spear fishing, tandem surfing, lifeguarding, and handling outrigger canoes.” The distinction between a sailor and a Waterman focuses on the coastal waters, while the sailor's realm is the deep water.

Turtle Bay resoundingly embraces the Waterman ideal

It does so by providing an immense variety of watersport programs and experiences for all generations and skill levels including children, parents and grandparents. And every day the resort’s Surfer, The Bar – a partnership between Surfer magazine and Turtle Bay  – celebrates the distinctive arts, music, film, fashion and history of the Waterman. Turtle Bay also hosts numerous events from championship level standup paddleboarding to activities related to the annual Vans Triple Crown Of Surfing.

Through its TalkStory programs, staged in Surfer, The Bar, Turtle Bay focuses attention on the Waterman’s goal of saving the seas by raising awareness of the environmental crises occurring in our oceans and seeking ways to protect our Blue Planet.

As Watermen, many surfers have gone on to remarkable careers.

They have become marine biologists, oceanographers and leaders of highly innovative companies, possibly because surfing is the domain of risk-takers. And the resort’s Surfer, The Bar - a partnership between Surfer the magazine and Turtle Bay  -  celebrates the distinctive arts, music, film, fashion and history of the Waterman.

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